How Hiring Managers Hire: The Insider’s Guide to Getting On A Company’s Radar

handshake by rawpixel
Photo by RawPixel

You all probably know this, but just in case you don’t, online resume submissions are one of the last places a good hiring manager will turn when first looking for a new hire.  It’s obvious when you think about it. Hiring managers want to have some assurance that the hire will be a good “fit” with them and their organization, and much like we turn to a neighbor to get their recommendation for a mechanic or electrician, so hiring managers turn to their network first to find prospects.  There is of course LinkedIn as a way to find talent, but since there really is not an employee “Yelp” site with useful comments and ratings, word of mouth is the next best thing.  Let’s think step-by-step how a hiring manager works when they have an opening.

First, most larger companies require every job to be posted internally.  This is a good thing.  You WANT to work somewhere that believes in retaining talent, encouraging lateral moves, and promoting from within.  This internal post usually goes up in the internal human resources site the minute an opening is coming up — or at least as soon as the manager and HR agree on a post-able job description.

Next, HR will post the opportunity on sites like GlassDoor, LinkedIn, Indeed, StartJobs.net, CareerBuilder and even CraigsList.  There are also any one of a dozen recruiting sites where young adults are searching for jobs (your on campus career center will have contracted with at least one of these services such as Handshake or Symplicity, and others focused on recent college grads such as WayUp and Talify).

BUT, and here is the thing – simultaneously the hiring manager is now going to work their own contacts, starting with current and former colleagues, friends at home, college buddies. And, as a former head hunter myself, I find that vendors in my specific industry are often one of the very best sources of leads.  The manager will be asking at conferences they attend and at non-profits where they volunteer.  Meanwhile, HR will be working their online platforms, screening resumes (often they receive hundreds, maybe even thousands, so there is a lot of sifting going on and a lot of room for errors and omissions).

In the end, current statistics show that 70% of candidates at all levels get their new job from networking, leaving just 30% of jobs to the more formal job application process.  At the entry level, companies are ever less likely to use a head hunter or employment agency, so unfortunately that pathway into a firm is less and less viable for young adults.  Periodically a company will hire a temp and then convert them to a permanent hire.  Stay tuned for an upcoming blog post on temping.  But, as you can see, it is very important to be out networking in your industry.

Make sure that you stay in touch with former bosses and colleagues, even those from long ago internships and every one of your summer positions.  General communications that you share regularly and professionally  – such as a blog or an article in local or college media, even intelligent posts in Facebook or on LinkedIn,  show you are accomplished in your knowledge area. Let your circle of contacts know that while you are very happy in your current role that you will entertain inquiries from other companies.  Help others when they ask whom you might know – make referrals to other talented professionals, this will come around to help you later. These are all strategies that will help keep you visible and in demand when openings happen at other organizations.